Miscellaneous 05.18

Friends,

One year ago we launched Miscellaneous as a simple forum to share the cultural items that inspire our team each month. We want to start this one-year-anniversary edition by thanking everyone who has contributed miscellany over the past year.

After a long winter, we welcome the great thaw. Green spaces are filled with sunseekers, and bike-trails with runners, cyclists, and rollerbladers in blissful motion. Trees are abloom. Dogs pull at their leashes, overwhelmed by the brew of new scents unlocked by the heat. In the newfound sunlight, we awaken as if from a long sleep, like the Lotus-eaters of the Odyssey.

This May, we hope you find time to feel the sun on your skin, lemonade in hand. Here’s to another year of fruitful wanderings in New York and beyond.

Stay tuned for more editions of Miscellaneous in the coming months.
Interested in contributing? Send us an email!

See
Akari @ Noguchi Museum
A Pink Chair @ The Wooster Group
Summer and Smoke @ Classic Stage Company

Watch
Kings of the Road (1976)
Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus (2006)
Wind River (2017)

Read
Hara Hotel — Teresa Thornhill
New Poetry by Indigenous Women
The Snakehead — Patrick Radden Keefe

Hear
Clean — Soccer Mommy (2018)
Alva Noto — Unieqav (2018)
Mark Duplass on You Made It Weird podcast (2018)

Questionnaire
Matt Owens, founder and Creative / Project Lead at Athletics, loves his Nintendo Switch.

Why he loves it.
“I hadn’t played video games (aside from a brief flirtation with Battlefield 1 on XBox) until recently, when my daughter Ida convinced me to buy us a Nintendo Switch. The Switch brought out my nostalgia for late nights playing an old Nintendo 64 with my wife Amy in her extremely small apartment in the West Village back in ’99. Now the Nintendo Switch allows me to teach my daughter all the tricks of Mario Kart while she battles Draugr’s in Skyrim. I know what you must be thinking, but it’s way more fun than re-watching Frozen for the 1,000th time. I thank Nintendo for making gaming pass as parenting.”

How it works.
“I have a strong competitive streak, and am also quite impatient. This is a difficult balance to maintain. The Switch helps equalize these impulses by combining simplicity with a deeper complexity. The more you engage, the more the complex elements of the system and games becomes simplified. Also, the team at Nintendo that figured out how to undock the controllers to create two controllers from one is truly genius.”

What it can teach us.
“Games are ultimately about problem solving. As we welcome an ever more agile world, it’ll be increasingly difficult to differentiate the authenticity of an analog experience from that of a digital one. Our kids are growing up in an environment that will require them to work through emotional and rational concepts across media at an ever-faster rate. Games can teach us a great deal about ourselves, particularly how well we embrace different approaches to tackling challenges, digital and physical.”

Poetic Fragment
“I never knew the earth had so much gold—
The fields run over with it, and this hill
Hoary and old,
Is young with buoyant blooms that flame and thrill.”

— From “Feuerzauber” by Louis Untermeyer (1936)

In Solidarity,
Athletics

Header Image: “La clef de verre” by Rene Magritte, 1959